I have not actually counted, but my strong impression is that in Professor Levinson’s engaging lecture on “Compromise and Constitutionalism,” the ratio of question marks to periods is much higher than in most English prose. His lecture raises lots of questions and offers only a few very tentative answers. And this cautious approach seems appropriate to the subject. The ethics of compromise essentially involve the problem of how to live morally in a morally disordered world-a world in which the people we live with and care about are morally disordered, and in which we know that but not always when or how we ourselves are morally disordered. It would be surprising if there were clean, orderly, demonstrable solutions to that problem.

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