This Comment provides an overview of the historical and constitutional purposes of copyright law and examines the law’s efforts to protect choreography prior to the 1976 Act. Part II discusses the rise of dance in America and observes the ways in which choreographers protected their creations prior to the extension of copyright law to “choreographic works.” Part III explains copyright law, concentrating on the 1976 Act and its particular application to choreography. Part IV begins by discussing why choreographers were slow to utilize the extension of copyright protection and then presents critics’ suggestions to make copyright protection more appealing to choreographers. Part V assesses the merit of these proposals with regard to the principles of the Copyright Clause and proposes alternative solutions to this issue beyond simply amending copyright legislation. Part VI concludes by reasserting the need to maintain the proper balance in copyright law by preserving the current legal framework.

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